Monthly Archives: February 2014

7 words that engage readers – a tip from the Gloucestershire Copywriter…

I was excited when NLP specialist Paul Goddard offered to share seven powerful words with us at Win-Biz Networking recently.

What Paul said resonated with me – I’ve been aware of this for a long time and regularly use these (and other) powerful words in my copywriting. Persuasive copy, containing powerful subliminal messages, needn’t be restricted to ‘high pressure’ American-style sales letters. Used judiciously, the seven ‘magic’ words have an important place in B2C and B2B copywriting – and the written communications we use every day at home or work.

So what are these amazing words?

  • Because
  • Now
  • Imagine
  • Please
  • Thank you
  • Control
  • The name of the person you are communicating with

seven words that will improve your writing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s consider them one by one.

Because

Paul used the oft-quoted example of the 1970s research involving a photocopier queue, and how the researcher’s ability to jump the line increased markedly when they added ‘because I need to make copies’ to their request. This is sometimes referred to as ‘the photocopier effect‘.

The lesson? Whether in written or spoken communication, using because strengthens the persuasiveness of your case. It could be on your website homepage or your next email. Either way, used with subtlety, this is a powerful word.

Now

As every direct-response copywriter knows, now adds urgency and encourages action from the recipient of your message.

Try it – NOW!

Imagine

This, as John Lennon’s songwriting has proved for decade, is a wonderful tool for getting someone to think ahead and envisage a scene, a benefit or a feeling. By asking your reader to imagine something, you can put any idea into their head.

For instance, imagine a bear on a jet ski, or the time you’ll free up for other business tasks if you hire a professional to do your copywriting. (And please note how the latter example is so much more useful for your business than the first one!)

Got it? Great! Now imagine using this technique in future.

Please

Because basic courtesies still matter. You’d say please in conversation, so why on earth wouldn’t you do so when you write.

Please remember this next time you write.

Thank you

For the same reason as above. Thank you!

Control

Another subtle one to be used with discretion. We all like to feel in control, especially when we’re trying something new or being asked to make a commitment. That’s why, as writers, it makes sense to remind your reader that they are in control.

They will have control. And so will you.

Use their name

I don’t mean for every other word as is so beloved of sales people who are trying too hard. What I mean is the judicious use of someone’s name to personalise your communication. When Paul Goddard spoke to us he was using the example with reference to spoken communication, but the same applies to writing – by addressing a spec-approach to a named individual , rather than to Dear Sir/Madam, for example.

In copywriting, where you don’t know the names of all the people who are reading your brochure or website page, you achieve a similar effect by using ‘yo’u and ‘your’s in your copy. It ties in with the idea of writing as we speak, of communicating directly with the person who is reading your copy at that moment. As well as personalising your message, use of more ‘you’ than we, emphasises that your message is more about your reader than you. That’s important.

You will do this in your writing won’t you.

Start using these powerful words today

So there they are, seven powerful words that you can start using today to enhance your written and spoken communications and give you subtle control – that’s because they work.

It takes practice to deploy them effectively in your business writing. That’s why an experienced marketing, technical or SEO copywriter might be your new best friend. If you don’t have the time, special skills or inclination to write your own SEO copy, brochure content or client case studies, imagine  the benefit of some professional help.

If that’s the case for you, please contact me now. In any case, please leave a comment after this post and tell me which words you find most powerful when you communicate – and why.

Thank you!

is an experienced Gloucestershire based copywriter specialising in Marketing, Web/SEO, technical and PR copywriting.

New Look blog from the Gloucestershire Copywriter

Slap my hands and send me to the naughty step.

I was listening to a podcast the other day (I think it was an old episode of Boagworld on website copy – and it’s a very good podcast too) and they were talking about usability and the challenge that red links pose to colour-blind site visitors. Uh oh!

Of course, for various reasons, my blog theme has used red links for the last year or so. Well, now I’ve put it right and the theme I’ve chosen works even better with my branding. So that’s a bonus. This, I hope, will be a keeper.

blogscreenshot110214

And if you visited and been frustrated by those red inks…sorry again.

Now it’s back to writing: blog posts for a business development consultancy, SEO copywriting for a specialist coatings business, more SEO copy for an SEO and digital marketing business. And lots more besides.

So much so that I thought I wouldn’t have time to write this week’s blog post. But as ever, something came up.

And I did. And this is it. Without a red link in sight!

is an experienced Gloucestershire based copywriter specialising in Marketing, Web/SEO, technical and PR copywriting.

Does this happen to you too? Tell the Gloucestershire Copywriter…

Do you listen to the radio while you work? Have you ever been writing or editing a document while the radio is on and noticed that a word is spoken just as you type it in your document? I’ve noticed this over the years and it’s happened enough that I’m fascinated why it occurs.

Combining background music or radio with writing or editing is a controversial and very personal subject. We all have a different view on its usefulness (or helpfulness) of background music or radio. Most of the time I’m creating new copy or editing, the most demanding thing I’ll listen to is Classic FM or Classic Radio Suisse. Often, I’ll even switch everything off and work in silence – it depends on the job. I usually reserve spoken-word radio for less demanding writing or editing because it can be distracting. But over the years I’ve noticed that I surprisingly frequently type or edit a word just as the same word is mentioned in a radio programme or podcast. Why is this?

So far, I haven’t been able to find references to this happening elsewhere on the Internet – maybe I simply haven’t been trying hard enough. I’d be interested to hear whether you’ve noticed this phenomenon or are aware of anything else that’s been written about it. If so, please tell me about it with a comment.

is an experienced Gloucestershire based copywriter specialising in Marketing, Web/SEO, technical and PR copywriting.