Season’s Greetings 2014 from Al Hidden, Gloucestershire Copywriter

season's_greetings_from_alh

Al Hidden is an experienced Gloucestershire based copywriter specialising in Client case study writing, Marketing, Web/SEO, technical and PR copywriting.

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Revealed: what you get when you pay $5 for an SEO article…

This is my 100th blog post, so I thought it had better be a cracker.

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I’ve long wondered what buyers actually get when they pay ‘peanuts’ for SEO articles or other copywriting on sites such as Elance, Fiverr and others of their ilk. I’d heard about the problems with poorly-written copy, writers who don’t have English as their first language and so on…

To find out what professional copywriters are up against from the so-called copy mills, I recently tried a little experiment. Here’s what happened…

Al Hidden is an experienced Gloucestershire based copywriter specialising in article writing, Marketing, Website and SEO copywriting, technical and PR copywriting.

Customer case studies: Sold! By your client in their words…

Well-researched and written client case studies are an effective way to get your clients to sell you in their own words. Once created, they’re easy to use across many print and online platforms with minimal reworking. Now that’s cost-effective…

Case studies are traditionally short and sweet – and rather clinical. They work by showing how you solved a client problem – to engage potential customers who face a similar challenge. And at the end, you quote your client, saying what a jolly good supplier you are.

But there’s another way, and in this article, I share my approach to writing client case studies where your client sells your business using even more of their words. Read more here…

Al Hidden is an experienced Gloucestershire based copywriter specialising in Client case study writing, Marketing, Web/SEO, technical and PR copywriting.

How good is your website content?

online content examples by the gloucestershire copywriter

 

 

 

 

In October 2014, I was invited to lead a couple of mini workshops sessions at The Business Kitchen’s introductory taster session held at Maggie’s in Cheltenham. My talk and the accompanying handout went down well with the attendees, so I thought I’d share them with a wider audience here…

For websites to engage humans and search engines, content is (and always was) king. Good content is relevant and meaningful to your site visitors, well written and consistent with your brand. Google’s recent algorithm changes have made content’s importance topical, almost as if content is a newly discovered recipe for online success. In reality, since Bill Gates’ prophetic 1996 ‘Content is King’ essay, the smart money has always been on creating content that helps your site visitors solve problems – in alignment with Google’s guiding principles.

Whether you just want content to read well, or you want it to help your search engine optimisation (SEO), good content writing matters. When SEO performance is important, the difference is that you’ll need to integrate properly researched page keyword sets into your content. Read more here…

Al Hidden is an experienced Gloucestershire based copywriter specialising in Marketing, Web/SEO, technical and PR copywriting.

What caught the Gloucestershire Copywriter’s eye this week?

I thought I’d try something completely different this week and flag up three things with writerly connections that caught my attention on radio and TV last week.

Jimmy PAge, LAdies of London and The Gervasutti Refuge

What caught the Gloucestershire Copywriter’s eye this week…

Page reminisces on Plant’s writing ability

Last Tuesday, Radio 4’s Front Row arts and culture magazine featured Kirsty Lang interviewing guitar icon Jimmy Page about the newly-remastered version of Led Zeppelin IV (the ‘untitled’ album) and the inclusion of a -previously unheard version of ‘Stairway to Heaven‘ recorded at LA’s Sunset Sound Studios. What was particularly interesting were Page’s reminiscences about the recording the original album version of ‘Stairway’ at Headley Grange in 1971 – and how Robert Plant wrote and recorded most of the lyrics in just a few hours. To quote Page:

…Robert was sort of sitting down against the wall and he was just sort of writing and writing and writing and he came up to sing at one point after we’d been working on it we’d got the whole of the structure and everyone’s remembering what parts to come in on … he comes in and starts singing and he’s got a major percentage of the lyrics already done at that point and it’s epic, the lyricism of that is epic. The moods that are created as it goes through are all coming to be and, as I say, Robert is just, he’s, he’s just independent of this, he’s, he’s just writing and writing and writing like it’s automatic writing at this point, he’s channeling, you know and he comes up and starts singing, cause he’s got a picture of it ’cause he’s listening to all the routining … it’s pretty inspired stuff…

As a professional writer who knows what it’s like to get in the zone with business copywriting, novel writing and even a bit of songwriting, I could relate to this. I just liked it, the story of how what is arguably the greatest rock song of all time was substantially written and recorded in two or three takes one afternoon.

From Headley Grange to London’s guilty pleasures

The week’s guilty pleasure came after reading a tabloid article about the ITV series Ladies of London. Although I can’t stand soaps, reality TV is another thing and I couldn’t resist a peek at one episode – and then another. There’s something worryingly compulsive about this hugely contrived fly-on-the-wall look into the lives of several British and American London socialites as they cat fight, quaff Champagne and do the rounds of London’s society events. As an SEO copywriter, I was particularly interested in one scene of Episode 1. That was when the oh-so-in-control (and very successful, with her upmarket Gift Library website) Caroline Stanbury’s marketing team announced that they hadn’t got the functionality to change any of their own keywords in the website copy. Oops! So rich, so cool but… such a schoolboy (or schoolgirl) online marketing error.

The ultimate copywriting refuge?

And then there was George Clarke’s Amazing Spaces on Channel 4 and his helicopter trip (helicopters: now that immediately caught my attention) to the amazing Gervasutti Refuge at 2833m in the Mont Blanc Massif. Constructed in 2011 to replace an earlier refuge, this ultra-modern, completely temporary, prefabricated pod by LEAPfactory offers sleeping accomodation for  12 people, broadband, solar power and the most amazing views imaginable over the Val Ferret’s Freboudze Glacier, in front of the east face of the Grandes Jorasses of the Mont Blanc range.

And what did I think? How that would make an amazing copywriter’s studio – if only one could keep one’s eyes on the work and not on the jaw-dropping scenery. Whistley Hill overlooking Charlton Kings is lovely, and inspirational, but the Gervasutti Refuge is something else again.

The newly-remastered Led Zeppelin IV, an episode of Ladies of London (well, maybe not) and a week in the Gervasutti Refuge with Mrs H. The climb out of the Val Ferret is a long, hard one if you don’t take the chopper, but surely a stairway to copywriter heaven.

Al Hidden is an experienced Gloucestershire based copywriter specialising in Marketing, Web/SEO, technical and PR copywriting.

The late Steve Jobs and PC PRO agree with me…

When I were a lad, back in the 1980s, selling building products in South East England, face-to-face interactions were the norm. In fact, with the exception of a bit of phone work to set up appointments and deal with customer enquiries (no LinkedIn or social networking in 1983), face time with customers was the norm. Send out quotes by post (yes, post), then arrange an appointment to discuss a job; meet on site to progress the project; meet over lunch at the Newbury Beefeater; and drop in when passing to maintain profile. It was all about building and nurturing relationships.

Some say you can run a creative project with Skype and email alone

Now I see copywriters in distant parts of the country proclaiming that you don’t need to meet your copywriter to run a writing project. Do it all with Skype and video conferencing and email and IM they say as they try to persuade Gloucestershire businesses that you don’t have to use a local copywriter when you are based in Cheltenham, Stroud, Worcester or Cirencester.

And, if the truth be known, you don’t always need to. But from my freelancing experience since 2006, it sure helps. I’ve worked remotely on occasions and done a damn good job without meeting the client. But it isn’t as easy as people make out and they were uncomplicated jobs. And at the end of the project, despite connecting on LinkedIn and phone chats and email dialogue, and despite a happy client, I often feel the relationship hasn’t developed as well as it could have.

Many of my clients disagree…

I’m not alone in thinking this and many of my clients agree with me. Just as I was told that people buy from people back in the 1980s, so I hear it from my regulars in 2014. Am I a Luddite? Absolutely not. I love technology and I love using it as much as the next copywriter, but have you ever tried to look at, handle and discuss a desk full of hard copy source material over Skype? Exactly. Which is why I was heartened to run into two references from the heartland of tech this week that support my assertion that face-to-face communication is by now means dead.

I was browsing a recent issue of PC PRO

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The first reference was in the July 2014 issue of PC PRO, on page 064 to be exact, in the depths of an RWC feature titled ‘Doing business in a social era‘.  Imagine my delight (and relief) when I read the following and felt the warm surge of validation:

In the 20th century we had face-to-face, supported by letters, then telephone then email. In the 21st century, relationships and friendships are online, which supports face-to-face meetings, often using the mobile phone. People still want to meet face to face, but a lot of the mechanics of getting there is done online. Social technologies just change the dynamics of the way you can work and amplify what you can do face to face

Read more: Doing business in a social era | Enterprise | Features | PC Prohttp://www.pcpro.co.uk/features/389299/doing-business-in-a-social-era#ixzz3G2ZzzQmQ

The last person you’d imagine enthusing about face-to-face meetings

The second reference concerns none other than the late Steve Jobs of Apple – the one and only, the very same Steve Jobs who was wrestling with the disastrous Lisa PC while I was selling concrete and mortar in Berkshire. Goodness knows how it has taken me so long to get to Steve Jobs, Walter Isaacson’s excellent and highly-rated 2011 biography of Jobs, but it has, Anyway, there I was immersed in a chapter about the design and construction of a then-new Pixar headquarters building when I came across this:

Despite being a denizen of the digital world, or maybe because he knew too well its isolating potential, Jobs was a strong believer in face-to-face meetings. “There’s a temptation in our networked age to think that ideas can be developed by email and iChat,” he said. “That’s crazy. Creativity comes from spontaneous meetings, from random discussions. You run into someone, you ask what they’re doing, you say ‘Wow,’ and soon you’re cooking up all sorts of ideas.”

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Thank you Steve Jobs

Thank you Mr Jobs, the visionary creator of tools that enable us to communicate so seamlessly anywhere and anytime. How true and how marvellous to read this within 24 hours of spotting the  comment in PC PRO.

Need I say more? I think not. Whether you call it face-to-face contact, face time, a well-run meeting, dropping in for a chat or just running into a client out of hours, the role of face-to-face interaction is most certainly not dead. In my book it’s vital; like so many ‘old school’ values that are quickly dismissed by the demographic cohort known as Millennials or Generation Y .

Something to think about

That’s something to remember next time you look for a specialist supplier in London, up North or down in the depths of Cornwall. On balance, and everything else being equal, having someone just down the road who can call in to take a brief or discuss the project and won’t need to charge an arm and a leg to do so, is rather attractive.

Al Hidden is an experienced Gloucestershire based copywriter specialising in Marketing, Web/SEO, technical and PR copywriting.

Two talented designpreneurs: one Gloucestershire copywriter…

It’s been a while since I last posted. Put it down to a couple of trips away (including Shetland), interspersed with a continued heavy writing workload. It’s that old shoemakers’ kids’ shoes thing – my own promotion suffers…

Working with two inspiring designpreneurs

One of my most recent projects sits nicely alongside another of this year’s writing high spots and both are interesting because they were for women who are pioneering innovative design-led bespoke services. So I thought I would tell you about two of my recent clients, Mati Ventrillon and Britta Curley.

Rejuvenating Fair Isle knitwear

Mati, for whom I wrote a new website,  is based up on Fair Isle, a French-Venezuelan Shetland incomer who became fascinated by the craft and tradition of Fair Isle knitwear, has mastered the centuries-old skills and added her own creative twist and entrepreneurial flair.
mati ventrillon
Mati’s bespoke knitwear has already caught the attention of the UK design fraternity – amongst other honours, Mati was featured in London Design Week a couple of years ago. As well as being a fascinating example of rejuvenating a specialised regional craft form, Mati’s entrepreneurship promises great things for the Fair Isle economy in the future – and offers a tempting array of knitwear for woollen garment lovers around the world.
al hidden copywriter mati ventrillon fair isle knitwear website copywriter

A new take on table design and finishes in Cheltenham

Much closer to my Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, base, Britta Curley’s business, (Curley Burrows) specialises in designing and crafting bespoke furniture with unique surface finishes and detailing. From large carved dining tables to small, coffee tables, every one of Britta’s creations is, like Mati’s garments, a unique work of art. Britta tells me that the launch of her business at September 2014’s Tent London design exhibition was a great success – aided, I hope, by my work as her press release copywriter.
britta curley
If you are a home or business owner seeking a stunning centrepiece table, or an interior designer seeking novel furniture ideas, you really should investigate what Britta’s up to at her studio in Cheltenham.
bespoke furniture in cheltenham: curley burrows

Two design talents – support from one copywriter

As well as both being ambitious, and highly creative, designpreneurs, Britta and Mati both recognised that specialised copywriting wasn’t their key skill and the best use of their time. In Britta’s case she was busy preparing to launch her business at Tent London. For Mati it was the launch of her Mati Ventrillon Fair Isle Knitwear brand online (as well as running a croft and bringing up two young children on one of the UK’s remotest island outposts) that demanded her focus.
In both cases, I was able to take away the research and writing ‘problem’ and create the engaging copy that will tell Mati’s brand story online and introduce Britta to the UK interior design media.

Watch Britta and Mati in future

And my takeaway after working with these two inspiring women? Watch both with interest, commission a Curley Burrows table and dress up for winter with one of Mati’s stunning garments. And if you need a hand getting copywriting off your to-do list? Please remember your Cheltenham and Shetland copywriter
Al Hidden is an experienced Gloucestershire based copywriter specialising in Marketing, Web/SEO, technical and PR copywriting.